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  1. #1

    Default Why is canned corned beef so expensive?

    Anybody know why canned corned beef is so expensive lately? It's over $5 a can at Kroger now.

  2. #2

    Default

    A totally flip anwer would be : the word "corn" is on the label. Have you priced Corn Oil lately? It's about 4x the price of vegetable/canola/rapeseed oil. Like $10 per gallon, because the corn is going to fuel.

    More seriously, I'd guess it's tied to the price of beef, which also is a lot more expensive than this time last year (see corn and other feedstocks).

    I'd also guess that the method of making it may have some more 'regulations' hitched onto it because it harkens back to when preserving meat was done with salts (ohhh, bad salt!!!) and at temperatures that make health inspectors giddy at the punishment enforcement codes that they can write up.

    I wonder where it's being made nowadays.

  3. #3

    Default

    The beef herds are way down. Least amount of cattle coming to market since 1953, with a much larger population.
    Reason? Cost more to feed than packers will pay, so cattlemen drop the herds. What you feed the animal is always your highest input cost. Plus, weak dollar means little to no imports of raw material.

    Take the damn corn back to food- not fuel, and all food would drop in cost drastically. Stop corn subsidies for gasoline. Record prices this year and next year due to the cycle of rebuilding the herd.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Napervol View Post
    The beef herds are way down. Least amount of cattle coming to market since 1953, with a much larger population.
    Reason? Cost more to feed than packers will pay, so cattlemen drop the herds. What you feed the animal is always your highest input cost. Plus, weak dollar means little to no imports of raw material.

    Take the damn corn back to food- not fuel, and all food would drop in cost drastically. Stop corn subsidies for gasoline. Record prices this year and next year due to the cycle of rebuilding the herd.
    Nobody hates ethanol more than me; the damn stuff actually caused the carburetor float bowl in my lawnmower to rust completely through due to the fact that it absorbs water like a freakin sponge. I hate it. Having said that, I read somewhere that after fermenting the corn or whatever it is that they do with it to make ethanol there is still stuff left over that can be fed to livestock and therefore ethanol production doesn't make meat more expensive. Can that be true? Doesn't make sense to me. After all, if you remove all that energy from the corn to turn into ethanol how can there still be anything useful left over that would feed an animal?

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by real turf fan View Post
    A totally flip answer would be : the word "corn" is on the label. Have you priced Corn Oil lately? It's about 4x the price of vegetable/canola/rapeseed oil. Like $10 per gallon, because the corn is going to fuel.

    More seriously, I'd guess it's tied to the price of beef, which also is a lot more expensive than this time last year (see corn and other feedstocks).

    I'd also guess that the method of making it may have some more 'regulations' hitched onto it because it harkens back to when preserving meat was done with salts (ohhh, bad salt!!!) and at temperatures that make health inspectors giddy at the punishment enforcement codes that they can write up.

    I wonder where it's being made nowadays.
    I Googled corned beef and it turns out that the word "corn" in this case is an ancient reference to the way meat was preserved back in the days before refrigeration. That is, with salt. The word "corn" back then referred to small grains of anything including grains of salt. Bacteria can't survive in the absence of moisture and so meat was heavily-salted to absorb all the moisture. Again, this is just what I read in Wikipedia; I'll defer to Naper for a more-indepth explanation.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SoftballVol View Post
    Nobody hates ethanol more than me; the damn stuff actually caused the carburetor float bowl in my lawnmower to rust completely through due to the fact that it absorbs water like a freakin sponge. I hate it. Having said that, I read somewhere that after fermenting the corn or whatever it is that they do with it to make ethanol there is still stuff left over that can be fed to livestock and therefore ethanol production doesn't make meat more expensive. Can that be true? Doesn't make sense to me. After all, if you remove all that energy from the corn to turn into ethanol how can there still be anything useful left over that would feed an animal?
    That would be complete bullshit. From your supply and demand training, if you increase demand for a commodity in 7
    years by 35%, what will happen to the price. Try 2.80 per bushel to 6.00 per bushel. Add in the increased demand and
    use of soybeans, and that goes up to. The dumbass politicians (Bush included) that cater to the whacko enviromentals
    - cost you $2,000 per year in food prices- just your grocery shopping.

    The incremental strains of ecoli that the govt now requires will raise the price of ground beef another 6% to go along
    with the hoax of "pink slime" (the picture they showed you was mechanically deboned chicken- first ingredient in cheap
    hotdogs), which raised the cost 10%........to go along with ethanol, which raises the cost 25-40%......should give you
    some idea how a tree hugger in Berkely who shits in the tree, ain't your friend.

  7. #7

    Default

    There is a byproduct of making mash whiskey that's a potential food stock. Within the past decade some scientists at Iowa State were touting it as a weed suppressant and (with breakdown by worms) soil ammendment/organic fertilizer. (Google old "Corn gluten meal"). Problems were: rodents loved it when it was stored, and it didn't suppress weeds very well over winter and early spring when weeds were worse.

    If you read the book "52 loaves", the author talks about visiting a yeast producer. The vol of a particular yeast that is the one used to turn corn into ethanol is a major industry and boost for the (very few) yeast producers out there.

    Nobody every counts the damage done to small combustion engines by ethanol, but there are so many dead lawnmowers, etc. out there. We make an effort to buy pure gasoline: we do get better mileage and our lawnmowers, etc. don't have the engine problems. (How dumb is Kentucky? they have almost no pure gasoline filling stations and the average age of cars in many parts of KY is greater than 10 years.)

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by real turf fan View Post
    There is a byproduct of making mash whiskey that's a potential food stock. Within the past decade some scientists at Iowa State were touting it as a weed suppressant and (with breakdown by worms) soil ammendment/organic fertilizer. (Google old "Corn gluten meal"). Problems were: rodents loved it when it was stored, and it didn't suppress weeds very well over winter and early spring when weeds were worse.

    If you read the book "52 loaves", the author talks about visiting a yeast producer. The vol of a particular yeast that is the one used to turn corn into ethanol is a major industry and boost for the (very few) yeast producers out there.

    Nobody every counts the damage done to small combustion engines by ethanol, but there are so many dead lawnmowers, etc. out there. We make an effort to buy pure gasoline: we do get better mileage and our lawnmowers, etc. don't have the engine problems. (How dumb is Kentucky? they have almost no pure gasoline filling stations and the average age of cars in many parts of KY is greater than 10 years.)
    I will not put anything in my lawn mowers/weed eater/pressure washer etc. except pure gas. Luckily there are several near me. It costs like a premium but well worth it.

    www.pure-gas.org

    I don't even want to get into the commodities fiasco that has happened the last several years with the number of speculators that jumped in and drove an irrational market completely away from the fundamentals.
    On a side note, for the last several weeks as you can tell by your prices at the pump many markets have turned sideways or down (such as corn). I'm not sure how long because ethanol producers have government mandates that will come onto play at the end of this month.


    Thanks PD!

  9. #9

    Default

    Commodity trading is not new, people have speculated on corn for decades, and most smart people will not touch it.
    Companies, however....have to own a certain amount of corn for their needs.....and those "speculators" make up the
    majority of the corn commodity. Most of my career, the first 25 years, corn moved in a somewhat predictable range
    based on weather. $6 corn is not normal nor would it be that high without artificial requirements and supplements to
    farmers for ethanol. Speculators are not responsible for massive increases, they have always been there.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Napervol View Post
    Commodity trading is not new, people have speculated on corn for decades, and most smart people will not touch it.
    Companies, however....have to own a certain amount of corn for their needs.....and those "speculators" make up the
    majority of the corn commodity. Most of my career, the first 25 years, corn moved in a somewhat predictable range
    based on weather. $6 corn is not normal nor would it be that high without artificial requirements and supplements to
    farmers for ethanol. Speculators are not responsible for massive increases, they have always been there.
    Of course they've been there for years but the sheer number of outside speculators holding long positions has also caused the rise away from the fundamental factors of weather/crop which has helped keep the market at all time highs the past several years. Commodities have been a much safer play to put their money with a weak US dollar and high demand for oil production.


    Thanks PD!

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by real turf fan View Post
    There is a byproduct of making mash whiskey that's a potential food stock. Within the past decade some scientists at Iowa State were touting it as a weed suppressant and (with breakdown by worms) soil ammendment/organic fertilizer. (Google old "Corn gluten meal"). Problems were: rodents loved it when it was stored, and it didn't suppress weeds very well over winter and early spring when weeds were worse.

    If you read the book "52 loaves", the author talks about visiting a yeast producer. The vol of a particular yeast that is the one used to turn corn into ethanol is a major industry and boost for the (very few) yeast producers out there.

    Nobody every counts the damage done to small combustion engines by ethanol, but there are so many dead lawnmowers, etc. out there. We make an effort to buy pure gasoline: we do get better mileage and our lawnmowers, etc. don't have the engine problems. (How dumb is Kentucky? they have almost no pure gasoline filling stations and the average age of cars in many parts of KY is greater than 10 years.)
    Where can you buy pure gasoline without ethanol? I'd gladly pay more for it to use in my small engines (lawmowers, weedeater, chain saw). Ethanol is the devil's fuel when it comes to anything with a carburetor.

    There's a company out there that's now selling propane-powered small-engine tools such as weedeaters, chain saws, and leaf blowers, among other things. The engines are 4-cycle and the fuel comes out of a Coleman camp stove bottle. Zero water absorption. From what I've been able to determine the company is reselling poorly-made, Chinese-manufactured junk at the moment. The comments from buyers talk about how the tanks won't fit, etc. But the idea sounds like a winner.

  12. #12
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SoftballVol View Post
    Where can you buy pure gasoline without ethanol? I'd gladly pay more for it to use in my small engines (lawmowers, weedeater, chain saw). Ethanol is the devil's fuel when it comes to anything with a carburetor.

    There's a company out there that's now selling propane-powered small-engine tools such as weedeaters, chain saws, and leaf blowers, among other things. The engines are 4-cycle and the fuel comes out of a Coleman camp stove bottle. Zero water absorption. From what I've been able to determine the company is reselling poorly-made, Chinese-manufactured junk at the moment. The comments from buyers talk about how the tanks won't fit, etc. But the idea sounds like a winner.
    I posted a link above Softie, but here ya go...

    www.pure-gas.org/


    Thanks PD!

  13. #13
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    Nashville (Hendersonville)
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    Default

    fuck gmo corn. fuck ethanol. fuck feeding cows corn. feed them grass.

  14. #14
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by real turf fan View Post
    It's about 4x the price of vegetable/canola/rapeseed oil. Like $10 per gallon, because the corn is going to fuel.
    is this what rapists use?

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FLAVOLS View Post
    I posted a link above Softie, but here ya go...

    www.pure-gas.org/
    Thanks. Do you have to claim that you want the stuff for an off-road or agricultural vehicle? I thought the law required most gas to be at least 10% ethanol. Of course my need is indeed for off-road use in my small engines.


 

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