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  1. #1

    Default Hickory Cane Corn

    Anybody ever eat Hickory Cane corn? I'm not sure but I think another name for the same thing is Hickory King. I haven't seen any since I was in high school but it was the best corn I ever ate while growing up. I haven't seen it sold anywhere in the Atlanta area. I'm don't know if you can still find it in Chattanooga. My recollection is that it was very seasonal.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Hickory Cane Corn

    Nah, we used to eat Neal's Paymaster corn exclusively but I havent seen that stuff in 20 years. It originated in Wilson County. If I had a bushel of that shit I'd be happy.

  3. #3
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    Default Looks like a grow your own deal Softball

    These people talk like its some sort of heirloom.

    http://forums.seedsavers.org/showthread.php?p=7481

  4. Default Re: Hickory Cane Corn

    Honestly, you can;t get good corn on the cob in the south. It just can't be done.

    What people go gag-ga over here would get surprised looks and laughs from corn folks in the midwest.

  5. #5
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    Default you are about right Tux

    Every year my cuz in Ohio sends me down a bushel of this corn they call Jubilee number BR 549 or some shit. Its yeller the ear is about 15" long, 4" diameter and makes silver queen taste like field corn. tOSU can't win a bowl game but they have engineered them some damn fine corns.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Hickory Cane Corn

    Dang Tux you're battin 1000 today. That's so true. I used to date a guy named Chad whose parents were from Iowa and they'd go on and on and on and on about how good Iowa corn was and how I'd never tasted anything like it...yada yada yada. They never sent me any. And incidently Chad never got a blow job (well, from me anyway). I never thought about it, but maybe those two things are connected.
    "I was born for a storm and calm does not suit me." -Andrew Jackson

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Hickory Cane Corn

    I ate what was called hickory cane corn all of the time growing up. As I remember, it was a whitish looking corn grown in gardens. It was edible on the cob but was best cooked fresh out of the garden fried or creamstyle (similar to the recipes with the iron skillet in the other corn thread). The versions that I remember had some salt, pepper butter, and milk in them (no corn starch). The bacon dripping would probably be good with it as well. Most people would shuck, pressure cook, and freeze the ears of any of the corn that was not eaten fresh and make cream style or fried corn after the gardens were gone for the year. It was better fresh but the frozen was also still pretty good. It seemed better than the stuff sold in grocery stores but most any locally home grown vegetable is probably going to taste better. I think of it as a basic country cooking recipe.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Hickory Cane Corn

    Quote Originally Posted by Stoli View Post
    I ate what was called hickory cane corn all of the time growing up. As I remember, it was a whitish looking corn grown in gardens. It was edible on the cob but was best cooked fresh out of the garden fried or creamstyle (similar to the recipes with the iron skillet in the other corn thread). The versions that I remember had some salt, pepper butter, and milk in them (no corn starch). The bacon dripping would probably be good with it as well. Most people would shuck, pressure cook, and freeze the ears of any of the corn that was not eaten fresh and make cream style or fried corn after the gardens were gone for the year. It was better fresh but the frozen was also still pretty good. It seemed better than the stuff sold in grocery stores but most any locally home grown vegetable is probably going to taste better. I think of it as a basic country cooking recipe.
    Yes, it was whitish and as I recall the kernels were...how to say it...not as tightly packed on the cob as typical corn. That made it easier to cut it off the cob which we used to do as kids and then mix it with pinto beans. Man, that was good eating. My parents would find it occasionally on road-side stands in Chattanooga or my dad would find it areas north of Chattanooga, again from road-side stands I believe. I don't recall if they ever found it in grocery stores.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Hickory Cane Corn

    I think we are talking about the same thing, my family (parents, uncles, etc.) were big time country gardeners and the stuff I ate came out of our gardens. As I recall, they bought the seeds at the CO OP or the local hardware stores. You went through the annual rituals of plowing the gardens, tilling, planting, and then the fun began. As soon as I was big enough to operate a hoe (the tool, not the chicks on MTV), they had me chopping weeds and taking care of the gardens.

    My parents and their siblings most all grew up during the depression and WWII era and they lived off of the small farm and garden stuff most of their lives. Just about everyone had gardens back in the 60s and 70s that lived in the country and the Hickory Cane was "the stuff" back then. I also rember folks selling the stuff along side the road but we rarely bought anything unless the weather/season was hard on a particular vegetable. They "put up" corn, green beans, tomatoes, preserves (apple, blackberry, and sometimes grape and strawberry), cucumbers (eat fresh and make pickles of the rest). We also grew mush mellons, watermelons, onions, spring lettuce, cabbage (I hate cabbage, pumpkins, and hot peppers. We also grew enough potatoes (whites and reds to last through late winter or early spring depending on how the growing season went. I even rember the hog killings and the hung country hams.

    I ate so much of that stuff growing up that I grew tired of it as a young adult but love the fresh home grown produce when I can get it today. The Fresh Market usually sells some tomatoes that they call "heirloom" that look just like some of the varieties that I remember in those gardens.

    I do not recall seeing the Hickory Cane in stores then or today but it is good stuff if you can find it. There surely must be an old timer around somewhere that still grows the stuff. I will check around with some older relatives that still garden and see what I can find out.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Hickory Cane Corn

    Oh yeah, use to have it all the time growing up. You can still get it at those little stands on the side of the highways and family farms around town.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Hickory Cane Corn

    Quote Originally Posted by Stoli View Post
    I think we are talking about the same thing, my family (parents, uncles, etc.) were big time country gardeners and the stuff I ate came out of our gardens. As I recall, they bought the seeds at the CO OP or the local hardware stores. You went through the annual rituals of plowing the gardens, tilling, planting, and then the fun began. As soon as I was big enough to operate a hoe (the tool, not the chicks on MTV), they had me chopping weeds and taking care of the gardens.

    My parents and their siblings most all grew up during the depression and WWII era and they lived off of the small farm and garden stuff most of their lives. Just about everyone had gardens back in the 60s and 70s that lived in the country and the Hickory Cane was "the stuff" back then. I also rember folks selling the stuff along side the road but we rarely bought anything unless the weather/season was hard on a particular vegetable. They "put up" corn, green beans, tomatoes, preserves (apple, blackberry, and sometimes grape and strawberry), cucumbers (eat fresh and make pickles of the rest). We also grew mush mellons, watermelons, onions, spring lettuce, cabbage (I hate cabbage, pumpkins, and hot peppers. We also grew enough potatoes (whites and reds to last through late winter or early spring depending on how the growing season went. I even rember the hog killings and the hung country hams.

    I ate so much of that stuff growing up that I grew tired of it as a young adult but love the fresh home grown produce when I can get it today. The Fresh Market usually sells some tomatoes that they call "heirloom" that look just like some of the varieties that I remember in those gardens.

    I do not recall seeing the Hickory Cane in stores then or today but it is good stuff if you can find it. There surely must be an old timer around somewhere that still grows the stuff. I will check around with some older relatives that still garden and see what I can find out.
    My parents were also children of the Depression and they always had a large garden. But although they loved Hickory Cane they apparently weren't able to get it to grow in Chattanooga. Although much of Chattanooga is covered with chirt our lot was covered in extremely-rich topsoil, something that to this day I don't understand since our lot was on a hill and had at one time been logged to boot. Anyway, the point is that even in very rich soil they apparently couldn't get Hickory Cane to grow. Either that or they could never get any seeds because they considered it a delicacy. Maybe Hickory Cane prefers a mountain-type climate.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Hickory Cane Corn

    A good corn here in West TN. is called Bodaciou's (spelling?)...man its good, very tender......i get it at the farmer's market when it comes in.....it does not last long at the market so we have to get there and stock up....

    tnphil


 

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